Educations

Who’s buying Treasuries? Domestic vs. foreign ownernship of U.S. federal debt

Video: Let's talk about the BOE's struggles and what does Bill Gates not get about cryptocurrencies?

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A short chat between Adam and eToro's senior market analyst, Mati Greenspan The Bank of England is facing some struggles to angle the market towards a rate hike tomorrow or in August. With cable at an inflection point, how does the central bank go about it? In this video, Adam speaks with Mati from eToro…
A Nobel Prize-winning economist explains what Milton Friedman got wrong

A Nobel Prize-winning economist explains what Milton Friedman got wrong

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Oliver Hart is a professor of economics at Harvard University. Hart won the Nobel Prize in economics in 2016 for his work in contract theory and is the author of "Firms, Contracts, and Financial Structure." Hart sat down with Business Insider's Sara Silverstein at UBS's Nobel Perspectives Live event...
An inverted yield curve is a recession indicator, but only in the U.S.

An inverted yield curve is a recession indicator, but only in the U.S.

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The yield curve’s unerring knack for predicting recessions seems to be a phenomenon exclusive to the U.S. As the flattening of the yield curve brings it closer to an inversion, in which long-dated yields fall below short-dated yields, some investors worry that it could soon signal the end of the ...
Human capital around the globe: How to measure the human input in GDP

Human capital around the globe: How to measure the human input in GDP

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What does it take to produce stuff? On a basic level, you need means of production: raw materials, land, some machinery, some structure, and humans. Gross domestic product (GDP) is the measure of all the stuff produced in a country (in each quarter or each year) and depends heavily on the means of...
Gold/Silver Ratio

Gold/Silver Ratio

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The ratio of gold prices versus silver prices is now up to the type of high reading that in the past 2 decades has marked an important low for both gold and silver prices. The value of anything is always and in every case a ratio. Most often the units are expressed as dollars per…
Statement by Commissioner Thyssen ahead of International Workers’ Day

Statement by Commissioner Thyssen ahead of International Workers' Day

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"Every year on 1 May, people all over the world celebrate International Workers' Day, also known as Labour Day. What began as a yearly strike movement has developed into a public holiday celebrating social achievements for workers. The first social achievement was the limitation of a working day ...
Which is the strong emotion, gain or loss?

Which is the strong emotion, gain or loss?

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Let’s say next week you make a profit of $1,000 in the market. And the following week, you lose $1,000. Of course, making money was better than losing money. But was the joy of winning greater than the pain of losing? For most people, it isn’t – losing feels worse. The thrill of victory pales…
Who’s buying Treasuries? Domestic vs. foreign ownernship of U.S. federal debt

Video: Learn to day trade stocks from the real deal

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A strategy to learn to trade equities live Meir Barak from Tradenet is the real deal. He trades live every day with more than 1500 traders watching his every move. He's been doing it for +10 years and has a proven track record of making money. Find out how he does it and how you…
Who’s buying Treasuries? Domestic vs. foreign ownernship of U.S. federal debt

Trading education: Fear is up as the stocks tumble. How can you deal with fear in trading?

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Instant replay of the weekend video... Oh boy, the stock market tumble is making a lot of people fearful.  That is never good.  If you are too fearful, you are crowding out the chance to succeed.   So how do you deal with it? If you did not see my weekend video, take a look.  If…
Who’s buying Treasuries? Domestic vs. foreign ownernship of U.S. federal debt

Who’s buying Treasuries? Domestic vs. foreign ownernship of U.S. federal debt

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As long as a government runs deficits, it has to find buyers for its bonds. In the years after the Great Recession, the Federal Reserve was a willing buyer of U.S. Treasury bonds. Since 2014, though, the Fed has put its buying spree on hold. So, somebody else must be taking up the slack. But…